Driving to Maine: Day 6

 The main labyrinth at Angel Valley retreat center in Sedona, Arizona.

The main labyrinth at Angel Valley retreat center in Sedona, Arizona.

Today was the last day Daniel and I were able to stay at the Thunder Mountain house before renters came in for a week. He’d asked me to be packed and ready by 7:45am, and to my surprise I was ready to go and in a great mood. He was taking me down to Angel Valley, a spot just outside of town down a long, “primitive” dirt road. I left the Mini at Cara Marie’s, loaded my never-used camping gear into her SUV, and we headed for the retreat center.

Angel Valley is known, in an area known for its “vortexes,” or centers of unusually magnified geological (and some say spiritual) energy, as one of the most powerful vortex sites in the southwestern US. People come from all over the world to experience the energy that seems to pool in the bowl of the place. The Oak River runs through the valley, creating a real oasis from the dry lands above.

angel valley cabins.jpg

I had only just realized that I’d spent 4 days in Sedona already, and here I was launching into another one. “I really should leave tomorrow,” I thought. Cara Marie wanted to give me a session with her at Angel Valley using her own special techniques, which include working with the Emotional Code and special tuning forks to free me from anything holding me back from past lives or negative programs picked up in this one. Again, I was bowled over by my friends’ generosity in giving me their time and attention. The sense of relief I’d felt on reuniting with Daniel and meeting Cara Marie continued to deepen.

I balked at staying the recommended two nights in Angel Valley’s campground by the river, feeling like I needed to get back on the road and continue my journey. But then tears came to my eyes and I realized I was actually afraid to experience what this place held for me. The caretakers in the office smiled knowingly and handed me a Kleenex. “People cry in here all the time,” Amayra (one of the co-owners) told me, “just from feeling the energy that’s here.”

A little later, Cara Marie gave me a beautiful sound-healing session under a large pine in the shade. As with so many of the subtle experiences I was having in Sedona, it’s hard to describe what happened. But I emerged feeling lighter and clearer as well. She showed me some of the meditation areas placed around the property, many formed in circles made of flat-topped red rocks and with ornate statues and polished minerals decorating them. There was a raven totem, two intricate labyrinths lined with red rocks and paved with red dirt, a shady, inviting hall lined with the residents’ artwork, lovely bath houses where each guest had a spacious private bathroom and storage area, and a tree-covered dining hall looking over the river.

angel valley raven.jpg

Cara Marie and Daniel helped me pick out a campsite and watched, ready to help, as I tried setting up my new hydraulic tent and inflated my fabulous 9-inch-thick air mattress. Everything worked great and so they left me on my own to enjoy the late afternoon. Dusty, sweaty, and with the temperature still near 100, I found an easy place to get into the creek and floated for a while. There were trout flickering through the rocks and odd little open clamshells scattered everywhere. The water was cold, but not shockingly so, and I got out after a bit feeling wonderfully chilly. I went to the dining hall down a short gravel road and heated up the rest of my chicken stew from the night before, now even better and richer.

 Oak Creek

Oak Creek

Finding my way back down to my creek campsite, I thought I would read or write for a while, but as the sky grew totally dark and the stars came out, I just stretched out and listened to the night sounds happening around me. Two bullfrogs began to talk to each other from nearby spots, and as I fell asleep, their drone began to seem like one long, smooth ooooooommmmmm, the very sound Daniel and Jonathan had encouraged me to make during my session with them. My voice wavering and quavering, unsupported and weak, that sound remained the most challenging song of all for me.